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Barnstormers - October 2010

Welcome to Barnstormers! This month, we share a variety of models submitted by the readers of Flying Models. We'd love to feature your models, too. Instructions on how to submit your photos can be found at the bottom of this article!

Sleek XB-51 by Clark Ross

Sleek XB-51 by Clark Ross

Sleek XB-51 by Clark Ross

Clark Ross designed this standoff scale model of the little known, but very interesting Martin XB-51 medium bomber. Designed in the late 1940s the jet used three engines in a very unique planform. Two of the engines were suspended at the bottom front sides of the fuselage, while the third engine was housed in the tail like the Boeing 727. The two main gear were housed forward and aft of the wing in the fuselage in a tandem configuration. Outrigger gear on the wing leveled the plane on the ground. This was the same gear configuration system used on the Boeing B-47. Clark’s model spans 50-1/2 inches and is 55-1/2 inches long. Though the real plane had three engines, Clark’s XB-51 model uses only two GWS EDF 64A electric ducted fans for power in the fuselage pylons. With a 2500 mAh 3-cell Li-Po battery in the fuselage and four channel control, the plane weighs 40 ounces. Its light weight can be attributed to the hot wire cut foam fuselage pieces reinforced with 3/16 square balsa.

 

Freedom from Torque by John Hunton

Freedom from Torque by John Hunton

Freedom from Torque by John Hunton

"With the availability of many sizes of pusher propellers and with the simplicity of reversing the direction of rotation of electric motors (just switch any two wires on an outrunner motor) it follows naturally to build a twin with the motors turning in opposition, thereby providing a torque free airplane. Some studies were done with various configurations, the most satisfying being the twin boom twin which performs best because of the rudders being in the propeller slipstream. Torque free flight is really worth the experience. All of these simple experimental models were built to test the different configurations possible and have spirited performance using very economical components."

 

Fun Phaeton II by Larry Krause

Fun Phaeton II by Larry Krause

Fun Phaeton II by Larry Krause

"This is my 'Phaeton II' biplane built stock from the Balsa USA kit. It is powered by a Magnum .62 4-stroke and has Futaba 4EX-FM radio gear. It was covered with white MonoKote with metallic wine MonoKote trim on the top surfaces, and black and white checkerboard covering on the bottom surfaces. The plane spans 52" and weighs a shade over six pounds. It is a delight to fly and a pussycat to land — Just put it over the runway and gradually reduce the throttle."

 

Fun Phaeton II by Larry Krause

In-progress Hobo by Tom Niebuhr

"Here’s my latest control line design, the "Hobo," after the framework was completed, and before covering and finish. Five prototypes are under construction: Three in Texas, one in New York, and one in Oregon. The Hobo is a very simple build and answers some of the fears of people who haven’t had a non-profile airplane. That is the reason for the upright engine, the option for external controls and simplicity. Sometime in the near future it will be published as an article so kitbashing will also be encouraged. I don’t think that there has been a new sport airplane developed in the last 25 years, and certainly there has never been an airplane with these options. It will avoid the pitfalls of profile planes, but still offer their attractive simplicity. Still have to test fly and tweak it before it’s completely ready."

 

Fun Phaeton II by Larry Krause

Giant Scale ME-609 by Bob Isaacks

The Messerschmitt 609 was designed late in WWII as Germany’s answer to the Twin Mustang. The plan was to couple two ME-309’s into a single (twin) airplane. None were ever built as Germany concentrated on jet aircraft development. The model was scratchbuilt from original plans to compete in “Giant Scale” at the Geneseo FAC Nats. The model features a 44-inch wing span; twin, counter-rotating 10-inch diameter propellers; and vac-formed spinners and canopy from my hand carved molds. Construction is traditional stick and tissue. The fuselage is box and former and the flying surfaces utilize geodetic structure for improved stiffness and warp resistance. Finish is Japanese tissue applied with nitrate dope and the final color is airbrushed Model Master acrylics. Power is six strands, 3/16-inch Super Sport rubber per side. For D/T the stab rotates on carbon rods built into the rudder and aluminum tubing in the stab.

 

Flying Models Barnstormers welcomes your submissions! Readers of Flying Models are invited to submit pictures (no more than three) and a brief description of their model (no more than 300 words). Images should be at least 1024 pixels across. Please send your submissions to Associate Editor Jim Wiggin for consideration. We look forward to your contributions!

Flying Models Magazine


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